My boss saw this in a magazine. I just had to turn it into a Facebook image for the ASTMH page.

My boss saw this in a magazine. I just had to turn it into a Facebook image for the ASTMH page.

13 Unforgettable Moments from 2013

Some years feel kind of significant, while others don’t seem earth-shattering on the whole. For me, 2013 was one for the books. If this year had a theme, it was: change, adaptation and growth. So here are my highlights, in some cases, with accompanying Instagram photos:

1 - Turned 30. And it wasn’t so bad! In fact, 30 was my favorite birthday in recent memory. I tend to get kind of sad around my birthday because it reminds me that time is marching on. But turning 30 was different. I felt content with where I’ve been, happy with the path I’m on and excited for whatever comes next.

2 - Celebrated my brother’s engagement. I was so excited to hear that my younger brother, Tyrone, got engaged to his love, Leah. Watching them teaches me so much about partnership.

3 - Became an American citizen. I am beyond grateful that my mom decided to move us here. I’ll always honor my South African roots, but I am proud to officially be an American too. (Photo of decorations and covered brownies my coworkers made to mark the occasion).

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South African restaurant chain Nandos always produces powerful ads. The occassion of Mandela’s passing is no exception. From their website.

South African restaurant chain Nandos always produces powerful ads. The occassion of Mandela’s passing is no exception. From their website.

SMOG DAY. Alarmingly high smog readings closed the airport and schools in Harbin, a Chinese city of about 11 million people.

SMOG DAY. Alarmingly high smog readings closed the airport and schools in Harbin, a Chinese city of about 11 million people.

The Little Detail That Makes Dennis Kimetto’s Chicago Marathon Win Even More Impressive

He pulled off his record-breaking win just six weeks after coming down with malaria. Seriously.

The incredible part of Kimetto’s story doesn’t end there — he is somewhat of an overnight running sensation. From the Chicago Tribune:

As fast as he ran Sunday, it pales in comparison to the pace at which Kimetto, 29, has gone from a non-running subsistence farmer in Eldoret, Kenya, to one of the world’s best marathoners, good enough to earn $100,000 for winning Chicago and a $75,000 bonus for the course record.

On the exhaustive track and road running data base, tilastopaja.net, Kimetto’s competitive record is blank until 2011, when it shows a lone race. Speaking through a Swahili interpreter, Kimetto said he had been growing maize and tending a few cows until he began running about four years ago.

Kimetto said he had been running about four miles a day when a chance encounter with Geoffrey Mutai, a Boston and New York marathon winner, led to an invitation to the demanding Mutai’s training group in a remote area, Kapng’tuny, some 40 miles from Eldoret.

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Album Art

Not all Americans are interested in international news, but the ones who are, tend to be the “most affluent, best educated,” Phil Balboni, president, CEO, and founder of GlobalPost, says in this interview.

ArtistCopyright Clearance Center's Beyond the Book
TitleInterview with GlobalPost Founder Phil Balboni
Photojournalism.
This is one of my favorite photos from Zambia so far. I’m traveling here as an International Reporting Project fellow (trip details). The photo was taken from inside a church in Chawama, a poor area in Lusaka. Zambians do not like the use the word slum, they say “compound” instead.

Photojournalism.

This is one of my favorite photos from Zambia so far. I’m traveling here as an International Reporting Project fellow (trip details). The photo was taken from inside a church in Chawama, a poor area in Lusaka. Zambians do not like the use the word slum, they say “compound” instead.

ABC News:”The George W. Bush Presidential Library dedication brought together five living presidents who have been at odds about much of the 43rd president’s foreign policy legacy, particularly the Iraq war. But they all agreed on, and offered effusive praise for, Bush’s work on Africa.”

ABC News:”The George W. Bush Presidential Library dedication brought together five living presidents who have been at odds about much of the 43rd president’s foreign policy legacy, particularly the Iraq war. But they all agreed on, and offered effusive praise for, Bush’s work on Africa.”

doctorswithoutborders:

Test Me, Treat Me: A Drug-Resistant TB Manifesto
We, the people infected with drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), live in every part of the world. Most of us were exposed and became infected with DR-TB because of the poor conditions in which we live. Undiagnosed, this disease spreads among us. Untreated, this disease kills. But in the countries in which we live, fast and accurate diagnosis is rarely available, and only about one in five of us actually get effective DR-TB treatment. 
Those of us “lucky” enough to receive treatment have to go through an excruciating two-year journey where we must swallow up to 20 pills a day and receive a painful injection every day for the first 8 months, making it hard to sit or even lie down. For many of us, the treatment makes us feel sicker than the disease itself, as it causes nausea, body aches, and rashes. The drugs make many of us go deaf permanently, and some of us develop psychosis.

doctorswithoutborders:

Test Me, Treat Me: A Drug-Resistant TB Manifesto

We, the people infected with drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), live in every part of the world. Most of us were exposed and became infected with DR-TB because of the poor conditions in which we live. Undiagnosed, this disease spreads among us. Untreated, this disease kills. But in the countries in which we live, fast and accurate diagnosis is rarely available, and only about one in five of us actually get effective DR-TB treatment.

Those of us “lucky” enough to receive treatment have to go through an excruciating two-year journey where we must swallow up to 20 pills a day and receive a painful injection every day for the first 8 months, making it hard to sit or even lie down. For many of us, the treatment makes us feel sicker than the disease itself, as it causes nausea, body aches, and rashes. The drugs make many of us go deaf permanently, and some of us develop psychosis.

(via nprglobalhealth)

While Haiti attracted a lot of media attention in 2010 after a massive earthquake devastated the country, most journalists left in the days and weeks following the immediate destruction.

About two years later — when few outlets had much interest in Haiti — Tate Watkins (@tatewatkins) arrived in the country determined to uncover interesting stories about U.S. aid to Haiti and home-grown technology and innovation.