doctorswithoutborders:

Test Me, Treat Me: A Drug-Resistant TB Manifesto
We, the people infected with drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), live in every part of the world. Most of us were exposed and became infected with DR-TB because of the poor conditions in which we live. Undiagnosed, this disease spreads among us. Untreated, this disease kills. But in the countries in which we live, fast and accurate diagnosis is rarely available, and only about one in five of us actually get effective DR-TB treatment. 
Those of us “lucky” enough to receive treatment have to go through an excruciating two-year journey where we must swallow up to 20 pills a day and receive a painful injection every day for the first 8 months, making it hard to sit or even lie down. For many of us, the treatment makes us feel sicker than the disease itself, as it causes nausea, body aches, and rashes. The drugs make many of us go deaf permanently, and some of us develop psychosis.

doctorswithoutborders:

Test Me, Treat Me: A Drug-Resistant TB Manifesto

We, the people infected with drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), live in every part of the world. Most of us were exposed and became infected with DR-TB because of the poor conditions in which we live. Undiagnosed, this disease spreads among us. Untreated, this disease kills. But in the countries in which we live, fast and accurate diagnosis is rarely available, and only about one in five of us actually get effective DR-TB treatment.

Those of us “lucky” enough to receive treatment have to go through an excruciating two-year journey where we must swallow up to 20 pills a day and receive a painful injection every day for the first 8 months, making it hard to sit or even lie down. For many of us, the treatment makes us feel sicker than the disease itself, as it causes nausea, body aches, and rashes. The drugs make many of us go deaf permanently, and some of us develop psychosis.

(via nprglobalhealth)

While Haiti attracted a lot of media attention in 2010 after a massive earthquake devastated the country, most journalists left in the days and weeks following the immediate destruction.

About two years later — when few outlets had much interest in Haiti — Tate Watkins (@tatewatkins) arrived in the country determined to uncover interesting stories about U.S. aid to Haiti and home-grown technology and innovation.

The one thing I’m proud of is the Nigerian family. No matter how old you are or how far you go, your family’s got your back. You can always find your way home. When I was much younger my dad or my friend’s dad used to sit us around their feet and tell us folk tales. We also used to sit under the moonlight and just dream. Of course that kind of thing is rare now, what with X-box and PS3 and Facebook and Twitter, but the memories are still with me. — from a Reddit IAMA with a self-identified 25 year old Nigerian doctor

Why Tuberculosis is Having the Worst Week Ever

For an often neglected topic, there’s been lots of news about TB lately. And it’s not the good kind.

Today in the New York Times, the American Enterprise Institute scholar Roger Bate highlighted the pervasiveness of fake TB drugs. Bate references findings from a new study published in the International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. The Washington Post got in on the story too.

The Lancet also published a TB study this week showing that an experimental vaccine did not offer more protection than the current TB vaccine used on babies. Just a few of the headlines on this:

So yeah, not a very good week to be in the TB control business.

theglobalconversation:

 At the World Economic Forum yesterday in Davos:Mark SuzmanManaging Director for International Policy and Programs, outlines the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s approach to transparency in response to a question from Austin, Texas:

In the new age of our world and its increased desire for transparency is full online transparency needed?

- Ruben Cantu

nprglobalhealth:

Where will the next big disease outbreak occur? 
Most pandemics — SARS, HIV and swine flu — originated in animals, like bats, monkeys and pigs. This map, from The Lancet’s recent series on zoonotic diseases, shows the world’s hotspots for emerging infectious diseases.
Regions with high densities of people, wildlife diversity and developmental changes are where viruses are most likely to jump from animals to people.
Map from Morse et al. (2012). 

nprglobalhealth:

Where will the next big disease outbreak occur? 

Most pandemics — SARS, HIV and swine flu — originated in animals, like bats, monkeys and pigs. This map, from The Lancet’s recent series on zoonotic diseases, shows the world’s hotspots for emerging infectious diseases.

Regions with high densities of people, wildlife diversity and developmental changes are where viruses are most likely to jump from animals to people.

Map from Morse et al. (2012)

publicradiointernational:

Bill Gates’ charitable organization, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is investing $370 million in the development of toilets that can improve sanitation around the world. Gates attended the Reinvent the Toilet fair in Seattle, where he looked at designs that included a toilet that used microwave energy to turn poo into electricity, another that turned excrement into charcoal, and a third that used urine for flushing.A total of 28 designs were shown off at the fair. A $100,000 prize was awarded to a team from the California Institute of Technology. Their design: A solar-powered toilet that generated hydrogen gas and electricity. More.
(Photo: Bill Gates with a researcher from the University of Toronto at the Reinvent the Toilet Fair in Seattle on August 14, 2012. By the Gates Foundation/Flickr.)

publicradiointernational:

Bill Gates’ charitable organization, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is investing $370 million in the development of toilets that can improve sanitation around the world.

Gates attended the Reinvent the Toilet fair in Seattle, where he looked at designs that included a toilet that used microwave energy to turn poo into electricity, another that turned excrement into charcoal, and a third that used urine for flushing.

A total of 28 designs were shown off at the fair. A $100,000 prize was awarded to a team from the California Institute of Technology. Their design: A solar-powered toilet that generated hydrogen gas and electricity. More.

(Photo: Bill Gates with a researcher from the University of Toronto at the Reinvent the Toilet Fair in Seattle on August 14, 2012. By the Gates Foundation/Flickr.)


Uganda’s national #Ebola isolation centre. No wonder our president wished us luck twitpic.com/adttrv
— Grace Natabaalo (@Natabaalo) July 31, 2012

TED Speakers Discuss Future of Africa on NPR Show

I’ve been catching up on episodes of NPR’s fantastic TED Radio Hour show, which includes snippets of TED talks along with interviews and insights from the speakers and other guests. 

The most recent episode features thinkers who have given talks under TED’s theme, “Africa: The Next Chapter.” In three segments, host Alison Stewart probes some brilliant African thinkers on their views. 

You’ll dig this. Listen to it

Azango writes about the emotional toll of her hard-hitting story and the challenge of protecting her 9 year old daughter after the piece was published.

Azango writes about the emotional toll of her hard-hitting story and the challenge of protecting her 9 year old daughter after the piece was published.