While Haiti attracted a lot of media attention in 2010 after a massive earthquake devastated the country, most journalists left in the days and weeks following the immediate destruction.

About two years later — when few outlets had much interest in Haiti — Tate Watkins (@tatewatkins) arrived in the country determined to uncover interesting stories about U.S. aid to Haiti and home-grown technology and innovation.

shortformblog:

New Jersey Democratic Rep. Donald M. Payne Dies at 77
New Jersey Representative Donald M. Payne has passed away.  A congressional source, close to Payne, confirmed his death to CNN this morning. Payne, a lifelong Democrat, served as New Jersey’s first ever African American representative in Congress. There is no information on a cause of a death at this time. (photo by House Committee on Education and the Workforce Dem) source

A former chair of the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Africa, Global Health and Human Rights, The Washington Post described Payne was “a leading voice on African issues” in Congress.

shortformblog:

New Jersey Representative Donald M. Payne has passed away.  A congressional source, close to Payne, confirmed his death to CNN this morning. Payne, a lifelong Democrat, served as New Jersey’s first ever African American representative in Congress. There is no information on a cause of a death at this time. (photo by House Committee on Education and the Workforce Dem) source

A former chair of the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Africa, Global Health and Human Rights, The Washington Post described Payne was “a leading voice on African issues” in Congress.

Two thoughts on this video, which is receiving a lot of attention.

1) This is a major collective reference point. It’s the sort of thing people could point to years from now to symbolize a major shift. Not sure that this is possible anymore because of how decentralized media is, but it totally has the makings of an NPR interview a 20 years from now. I can already hear the questions about whether she remembers playing with an iPad, how her media habits have changed etc.

2) I’ve seen people questioning whether the baby really thinks the magazine is an “iPad that doesn’t work.” There’s a health story in all this. What is the baby actually able to realize / process? Maybe a neonatal neurologist is the person to ask.

A Hurricane Irene Baby Boom?

From the Washington Post:

Doctors alerted women who are due to give birth in the next week or so to have their hospital bags packed a little early. The drop in barometric pressure associated with the hurricane could cause a woman’s water to break early. Hospital officials said they are aware that lowering of atmospheric pressure tends to result in a spike in births.

Right on, man.

Right on, man.

Less Travel to Middle East and North Africa Reduces International Air Traffic in February

Here’s something in today’s predictable, but still interesting category: unrest in the Middle East slowed growth in air passenger numbers this February, the BBC reports.

The International Air Transport Association said:

February demand growth was down significantly from the revised 8.4% and 8.7% expansion recorded in January for passenger and cargo traffic respectively. The political unrest in the Middle East and North Africa during February is estimated to have cut international traffic by about 1%. As such it is responsible almost entirely for the slippage in passenger demand growth.

jtotheizzoe:

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of TB.
Today is World TB Day, calling attention to the fight to eliminate tuberculosis around the world. WHO estimates that one-third of the global population is infected with TB bacteria, and 1.3 million people died from TB in 2010.

Yes. One-third of people in the world have TB, but most of those infections do not become active.

jtotheizzoe:

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of TB.

Today is World TB Day, calling attention to the fight to eliminate tuberculosis around the world. WHO estimates that one-third of the global population is infected with TB bacteria, and 1.3 million people died from TB in 2010.

Yes. One-third of people in the world have TB, but most of those infections do not become active.

(via jtotheizzoe)

shortformblog has put an important health story on our radar:

This is very disturbing, and very unreported: Have you heard about the plight of Jennifer Rexford? The Gulf resident and BP cleanup worker has been documenting on YouTube and Twitter the health issues she and others have faced in the wake of the Gulf Oil Spill. (There haven’t been any updates in about two weeks … given her health issues, we hope everything’s OK.) She’s having trouble getting any sort of financial help. Plus, she says she’s not alone, and that others are in the same situation as she is. Very disturbing. Very eye-opening. Also worth watching? The story of Paul Doom, a twentysomething Florida resident who was planning on going into the Marines, but instead became paralyzed after swimming in the Gulf of Mexico. The two have only gotten limited press coverage. What’s going on? We want some answers. Not just studies. (Thank you definitelynotcanon – sincerely! This story needs our attention.) source

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My favorite part of this interview I did with Julie Fischer of the Stimson Center is when she spoke about the complexity of addressing global health so that it does not harm U.S. national security interests.

"This is something that’s not amenable to a traditional security solution … you cannot invade a country to improve its health. But you can form long-term partnerships," she said.

She also spoke about the increased likelihood of zoonotic diseases in some regions, such as Southeast Asia, as a major concern from a security standpoint.

(p.s. this is my 100th post!)

I’m kind of a big deal.

In my inbox this morning:

Um. You guys all know Mark, right?!